Whisper Porn, ASMR and ‘Head Orgasms,’ Explained

By Amber 0

If you’ve spent enough time loitering on YouTube you may have accidentally stumbled upon a strange genre of video called “ASMR.” These clips, in which someone typically stands really close to a webcam and whispers about literally anything, are meant to stimulate a sensation called “autonomous sensory meridian response.”

Descriptions of what, exactly, ASMR feels like can be as baffling as the videos designed to induce it. Most accounts talk about a “fizzing” or “tingling” sensation in the head and spine. Another attempt came up with “pleasurable headache,” a phrase so oxymoronic it obscures understanding. “Head orgasms” is another common description, but I don’t like that one because the feeling is not necessarily sexual. (I say necessarily because there are evidently now videos that aim to titillate and induce ASMR—you can look them up on your own.) The only thing that everyone seems to agree on is that it’s relaxing.

Here’s my best shot at explaining what it feels like, as someone who’s experienced it: a hypnotic sense of relief. It’s hypnotic because you become focused on a small detail—the motion of a hand, or the sound of a latch. And it’s this detail that will over and over cause the reassuring “fizzing.”

Really, though, it’s a you-have-to-feel-it-to-get-it situation. Which makes it ironic that those ubiquitous ASMR videos can not work on people who are otherwise capable of getting the feeling. I would know—I experience ASMR, but never on account of something designed to cause it. I find the YouTube whisper genre a little unnerving.

For the rest of us, there’s what some call “unintentional ASMR.” So in the interest of your self-discovery, here are my most tried-and-true genres of ASMR, as someone who hates ASMR videos.

[via menshealth]